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Running Resiliency: Injury management for the endurance athlete

Overview
 
This two day practical course is a thorough and extremely practic best-practice management of the injured runner. The course emphasis is on the manipulation of load and stress management in our injured patients and integrates running biomechanical principles within the biopsychosocial framework.  
 
Participants will learn:
  1. the common running injury risk factors and means of modifying those risk factors.
  2. The biomechanics of running, how those biomechanicsrelate to injury and how those biomechanics can be changed will be taught.
  3. Participants will become very comfortable and proficient in performing a treadmill analysis of a runner’s technique. Both video examples of treadmill analyses and in person treadmill analyses will occur throughout the course.
  4. A best evidence guide to exercise prescription for pain relief, increasing load tolerance, injury management and performance will be taught and participants will become comfortable adapting exercise programs for the individual needs of their patients.
  5. How to keep a runner running when in pain and learning when a runner must rest
  6. Building physical and psychological resiliency in your patients through appropriate education
 
Bottom line, you will be comfortable performing a thorough analyses of the all the factors contributing to stressors on a runner, gait analyses (with potential modifications) and exercise prescription for both performance and injury management. You will be comfortable changing an injured runner’s training program to keep them running and will gain proficiency in designing training programs that also function as rehabilitation programs.

 

Running Resiliency Outline
 
Day 1:
A. Course Overview (9.00 - 11.00 hours)
  1. What does a resilient runner look like?
  2. What is the opposite of a resilient runner
  3. Components of best treatment
    1. Load management
    2. Symptom/Stress modification
    3. Exercise Prescription
    4. Cognitive Restructuring
 
B. Running Biomechanics, Injury Risk and Treatment Implications (11.00 - 13.00 hours)
This section will follow a similar template for each body region. A description of the basic kinematics and kinetics of the body region during the phases of running will occur, followed by an exploration of the potential injury risk factors and an overview of how those risk factors can be addressed. When appropriate suggestions for performance will be made. Below is an example of the Foot, Ankle and Shank.
  1. Foot, Ankle and Shank
    1. Foot strike kinematics, kinetics and muscle function
    2. Influence of anatomical variations on function
    3. Potential variables related to injury
    4. Potential variables related to efficiency
    5. Influence of shoes on injury risk and efficiency
 
  1. Knee
    1. Foot strike kinematics, kinetics and muscle function
    2. Influence of anatomical variations on function
    3. Potential variables related to injury
    4. Potential variables related to efficiency
 
  1. Hip
    1. Foot strike kinematics, kinetics and muscle function
    2. Influence of anatomical variations on function
    3. Potential variables related to injury
    4. Potential variables related to efficiency
 
  1. Trunk and Arms
    1. Foot strike kinematics, kinetics and muscle function
    2. Influence of anatomical variations on function
    3. Potential variables related to injury
    4. Potential variables related to efficiency
 
C. Load Management and Training Variables (14.00 - 17.00 hours)
This important section will introduce to the participant to the various training program and components of traditional running programs. An evaluation of the relationship between all loads (mechanical and psychosocial) and injury risk will be explored. Injury case studies will be shown to demonstrate how training variables can be manipulated to address common running injuries.
 
Training
PT’s should look at an athletes training log/plan - in brief this can highlight what leads to injury, overtraining, burnout, poor performance and the contrary. This also enables the PT to get to know their athlete more with regards to attitudes/beliefs around training.
If the athlete has a coach it offers more opportunities to gather more information regarding training and the athlete themselves.
Frequency, Duration, Intensity, Consistency - Note an athletes chronic load and acute loading. Examples of whats good and whats not: basically a consistent training load to maintain chronic load (week in week out), some intensity but the majority of training aerobic. Demonstrate injury risks.
Rest periods and holidays.
Environment - runners attitude to different terrain and excellent opportunity for a PT to promote resiliency by
Training groups / partners - reasons why they train with others: Positive: social, motivation, fun. Negative: Being pushed too far beyond current capacity or not enough, competing in training - the runner who competes to win in training because it is easier to do in a race - often injuries become a ‘get out of racing card’.
Supplemental training they do - Why are they doing it? Is it for the right reasons: Including Weights, Plyo, Drills, Yoga, Stretching, Pilates.
 
Other Stressors
Social, Family, Work, Other commitments, hobbies - how does an athlete fit running into the rest of their life.
 
Rest Recovery
Basically what can restore an athletes homeostasis from a sympathetic/training state to a parasympathetic / resting state - sleep, rest, nutrition, whatever relaxes an athlete
 
Equipment
Running shoes - Advice I give is light weight and some cushioning. Supportive/Heavy cushion/Minimalist not necessary though salient point is what ever you wear make sure it feels good and allow for adaptation when changing footwear.
Compression wear / tape - I don’t endorse either (perils of decreasing resilience) but when it might be OK (no harm if an athlete just likes to use them).
 
Competition
How often do they compete.
Preparation
Attitude and beliefs surrounding racing.
 
Examples
I’ll give an example of what an elite athlete’s training plan would look like and a good and poor example of an amateur athletes plan.
Examples of how to adjust an athletes training plan with regards to injury: e.g. decreasing intensity/duration but maintaining frequency/aerobic training to maintain run condition.
 
Day 2: 
D. Running Analyses and Re-education (9.00 - 10.30 hours)
  1. How to perform a treadmill running analysis will be taught
  2. The rationale behind symptom modification, associative learning and stress shifting as a temporary desensitizer will be explored
  3. The literature on running re-education will be reviewed
 
E. Comprehensive Capacity - Exercise Prescription for the Injured Runner (10.30 - 12.00 hours)
  1. The limited role of exercise prescription and minimal effective dose for common injuries will be reviewed
  2. Special emphasis on tendinopathy loading will be reviewed
  3. The case for simple exercise loading for common running related injuries will be made
 
F. Cognitive Restructuring (12.00- 13.00 hours)
  1. How to make the shift in your athletes from dependency to an internal locus of control
  2. The role of expectations and beliefs on fragility and running injury sensitivity
 
G. Performance and Special Topics (14.00- 15.00 hours)
  1. The role of plyometrics
  2. The role of strength training and efficiency
  3. The role of stiffness and flexibility
  4. Can gait retraining influence efficiency
  5. The importance of just running for performance
 
H. The simplified Assessment (15.00 - 16.30 hours)
  1. Ruling out the sinister and serious
  2. A debunking of the majority of orthopaedic testing
  3. Expose or Protect? Decision making on when to load to adapt or when to advocate relative rest 

Hotel de Witte Bergen in Eemnes

Hotel de Witte Bergen in Eemnes is the venue for multiple courses HumanMotion does in the Netherlands.
www.hoteldewittebergen.nl

Amsterdam, is only 35 kilometres from the hotel. Amersfoort and Utrecht are only 20 kilometres away. The airport is 48 kilometers from the hotel.


How to travel:

From the Airport
We advise to travel by train from Schiphol airport to Hilversum and get a taxi from the trainstation Hilversum to hotel de Witte bergen. Total cost would be around: (1 way) € 10,00 for the train from Schiphol to Hilversum and € 22,50 for the taxi from  train station Hilversum to hotel de Witte Bergen (all prices are estimated prices)

the phone number to make a taxi reservation is: +31 35 531 8080 (taxi Eemnes) Mostly there are also taxi’s on the station as well you can ask them for their rates.

You can by your train ticket at the train stations

From Amsterdam
We advise to travel by train from Amsterdam to Hilversum and get a taxi from the trainstation Hilversum to Hotel de Witte bergen. Total cost would be around: :…(1 way) € 10,00 train € 22,50 taxi (all prices are estimated prices)

The phone number to make a taxi reservation is: +31 35 531 8080 (Taxi Eemnes) Mostly there are also taxi’s on the station as well you can ask them for their rates.

You can buy your tickets at the train stations.

 

By Car

 

From Amsterdam  A1
Direction Amersfoort by A1
Exit Utrecht / Almere (A27)
Exit Hotel de Witte Bergen sign
 
From Amersfoort  A1
Direction Amsterdam by A1
Exit Utrecht / Almere (A27)
Exit Amsterdam / Hilversum Noord (A1)
Exit Hotel de Witte Bergen sign
From Utrecht A27
Direction Hilversum / Almere A27
Exit Amsterdam / Hilversum Noord (A1)
Exit Hotel de Witte Bergen sign
From Almere A27
Direction Hilversum / Utrecht by A27
Exit Amsterdam / Hilversum Noord (A1)
Exit Hotel de Witte Bergen sign

 

Dr Greg Lehman

Dr Greg Lehman BKin, MSc, DC, MScPT

I am both a physiotherapist and chiropractor treating musculoskeletal disorders within a biopsychosocial model.

Prior to my ... 

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Dr Greg Lehman BKin, MSc, DC, MScPT

I am both a physiotherapist and chiropractor treating musculoskeletal disorders within a biopsychosocial model.

Prior to my clinical career I was fortunate enough to receive a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council MSc graduate scholarship that permitted me to be one of only two yearly students to train with Professor Stuart McGill in his Occupational Biomechanics Laboratory subsequently publishing more than 20 peer reviewed papers in the manual therapy and exercise biomechanics field. I was an assistant professor at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College teaching a graduate level course in Spine Biomechanics and Instrumentation as well conducting more than 20 research experiments while supervising more than 50 students. I have lectured on a number of topics on reconciling treatment biomechanics with pain science, running injuries, golf biomechanics, occupational low back injuries and therapeutic neuroscience. My clinical musings can be seen on Medbridge Health CE and various web based podcasts. I am currently an instructor with therunningclinic.ca and with Reconciling Biomechanics with Pain Science.  Both are continuing education platforms that provide clinically relevant research that helps shape and refine clinical practice.

While I have a strong biomechanics background I was introduced to the field of neuroscience and the importance of psychosocial risk factors in pain and injury management almost two decades ago. I believe successful injury management and prevention can use simple techniques that still address the multifactorial and complex nature of musculoskeletal disorders. I am active on social media and consider the discussion and  dissemination of knowledge an important component of responsible practice.


Price€ 495,00
Including syllabus. Lunch not included.
Reception Date(s)11-11-2018 at 08:30
12-11-2018 at 08:30
Start time(s)11-11-2018 at 09:00
12-11-2018 at 09:00
Ending time(s)11-11-2018 at 17:00
12-11-2018 at 17:00
LocationEemnes (NLD)
Speaker(s)Dr Greg Lehman
ReviewNone
DidactTheory and Practice
Terms and conditionsTerms and conditions
LeadJasper Smeenge
Contact Hours12
Min-max participants10-30
Accreditation14 punten voor algemeen- en sportfysiotherapeut
Duration2 day(s)